Newsletter

End of School Year Newsletter 2018-2019

 

Forest Families,

What an adventure this year has been. It is incredible to look on this year and appreciate what a beautiful experience it has been, not only for the children, but for the teachers, also.  The growth and development of the group, as well as each individual child, are leaps and bounds ahead of where they were at the beginning of the school year. The teachers and I cannot thank you enough for trusting us to guide your children in a way that is different than any other program. With our focus on being on life skills, we’ve seen the children thrive in bravery, emotional regulation and resilience, physical strength and resilience, social skills and communication, expressing their feelings/wants/needs/dislikes/likes through words and feeling confident to do so, getting along with others, problem solving, using their imagination, developing respect and love for themselves and all living things, teamwork mentality, and so much more. I’ve had multiple parents approach me, sharing stories of how they feel this program has quickly improved behaviors and habits at home, especially where emotional meltdowns are concerned. Many other improvements have been seen at home with sibling relations, following directions, eating well at meal times, sleep patterns, using their imagination, and choosing to “try again” when they are working on something or when they want to express themselves more accurately. It is wonderful to see what just one school year can do in development and growth. One of the most fascinating things to see develop was watching the children create their own traditions and games with each other in each area we visited.  Whether that was leaving acorns at the same base of a tree to feed the squirrels on a regular basis, or gathering together to play the same game picking right back up where they left off. Their memory and imagination was continually impressive! The familiarity and love they develop for an area was also very significant. They chose to take care of it, picking up trash, and following the rules and regulations of the area. The children loved repeating sayings such as “pack it in, pack it out” and “leave an area better than you found it”. The care and consideration the children developed for each other was inspiring. When disagreements would arise, their willingness to talk about it, try again, and to repair the situation was wonderful to see. You could often observe the joy experienced after an issue was resolved, and they could resume playing and having fun together. I could go on and on about the beautiful experiences

 

Highlights from Fall:

Forest School during the Fall was magical! We watched the leaves change from green to orange and red and yellow. The kids and teachers LOVED gathering up the leaves together and throwing them up in the air together. One of the children’s favorite places to play and hike to, was the “big dirty hill”. About 10 feet high, this semi-steep hill would get slippery and muddy. The children had to use their strong bodies to climb up a long root sticking out of the ground to get to the top. Often, the children would help each other and reach down for the others once they reached the top. Sometimes the children would slide down in “train-form” and giggle all the way to the bottom.

During the Fall we had an amazing opportunity to be visited often by a female red-tailed hawk almost daily for a couple weeks. She would sit low in the trees, and she’d soar from tree to tree. The children and teachers would slowly and quietly follow her through the trees to get a good look at her.

 

Highlights from Winter:

WOW! What a Winter we experienced this year! SO MUCH SNOW! Not only did the children develop physical strength and grit, but the teachers did, also. As a society, we are used to feeling warm and comfortable all the time with indoor temperature regulations. How cool it was to see the children become more comfortable with discomfort, and to create joyful experiences that helped warm our bodies, grow in family vibes, and have fun nonetheless! Sledding, snow angels, snowmen, snow-slides on their bums, and hiking into the forest all became almost daily routines. One of their favorite activities was making bird feeders, where we spread sunflower butter on pine cones and rolled them with local wild bird seed. The children hiked around and used twine to hang them in the trees. Hours later we would check on the feeders to see if they had been eaten and/or carried away by squirrels. This encouraged the children to see that we can help the other living animals.

 

Highlights from Spring:

This spring we experienced so much rain! We spent a lot of time at the park with a covered area. We learned that wet-cold feels much colder than dry-cold and the children continued to persevere in their skills to find their peace/calm through discomfort, and that fun can be had no matter the weather! The children loved the large fabric frisbee game in the big grassy field.

Once the weather warmed up a bit more, we were able to venture back into our forest where we experienced new flowers, green leaves, so many worms, and bugs. The children especially loved lifting up rocks and fallen logs to see what was underneath. So many slugs, worms, spiders, and potato bugs!

 

The children are familiar with the respectful concept of not picking up bugs with their fingers, due to the fact they might squish the bug and kill it. They experienced passing a bug around to each other too fast, and too excitedly. After 2-3 reminders that they might squish the bug, I allowed the children to choose for themselves how to handle the insect. Within a couple minutes, the small group of children went silent. Someone said sadly “I think he died”. This was followed by “oh nooo,” “I’m so sorry bug,” “we picked him up too much with our fingers,” “we squashed him,” “I’m so sad,” “I’m sad, too” The teachers and I slowly came closer to the group, and we asked gently and lovingly “what happened?” The children explained. I asked, “How does that make you feel?” the children replied “sad” and they all fell silent for a moment. We all were close in proximity and were leaning on each other. I asked the children if they’d like to bury the bug to show respect for its body. They all showed a bit of joy in being able to do something kind for the dead bug. This experience really allowed the children to feel sympathy and empathy for another living thing. After this experience, the children reminded each other to be gentle and careful multiple times a day. They reminded each other to pick bugs up with leaves, and if the bug didn’t want to climb onto the leaf, to respect its choice for themselves, and “we can learn about the bug if we watch what they do!”

 

Mid-Fall Term 2018 Newsletter

Forest Families,

Summer has been over for a few weeks now and these cold Fall mornings have us all bundled up like Eskimos! Our beautiful warm sunshine rises above the Wasatch and by 10:30 we’ve shed the majority of our layers as we enjoy the warmth.

Every child has grown closer to one another. It is not uncommon to see the children holding hands and hugging each other, helping each other out, and checking on each other. Each week we see growth in resiliency, emotional regulation, independence in keeping their personal items together, and carrying their own backpacks.  We had two new children start in October, and they quickly became a part of the Forest Preschool family. One thing the children at Forest Preschool are very good at, is welcoming in new children and inviting them to play.

Weekly Themes

Each week we have a general theme, encouraging certain skills and characteristics. We also have a craft or activity that usually (but not always) supports a visual image of our theme:

 

October:

Week 1: Pet Rocks (Nurturance, and taking care). Many of the children pretended their rocks were babies instead of pets. Either way, the children fed them, rocked them, played with them, and carefully carried them when we hiked out for the day.

Week 2: Leaf Necklaces (Fine Motor Skills) Each child worked with a teacher to use twine tied to a stick (needle and thread) to push through leaves to make a necklace.

Week 3: Tracing Nature Items (Shapes and Fine Motor Skills)

Week 4:  Using Sticks as other items (Imagination Development) We read this book called

“It’s Not A Stick,” and we encouraged the children to come up with many ways of using sticks. Magic wands, leader of a marching band, fishing pole, weight lifting, shovels, airplane wings, fireman water hose, and so much more! Can YOU think of any more?

Week 5: Pumpkin Carving (Sensory Play). Each day this week we carved open a pumpkin and let the children discover what was inside, to play with the guts, to count the seeds. One of the days, the children worked together to create a “volcano pumpkin” and each took turns spilling the guts out the top as it erupted.

November:

Week 1: This was our first week in our new location, and instead of offering a craft or structured activity, we focused on allowing the children to familiarize themselves with the are and to fall in love with their discoveries.

Week 2: This week our activity has been “measuring,” where each child is equipped with measuring tools. There are 2 different types of measuring tape, and the children must share and trade with each other throughout the day as needed, to allow everyone to experience both types of measuring. (retractable measuring tape, and ribbon measuring tape). The theme of Sharing this week is paired with a storybook, read each day at lunchtime, called The Bear Who Shared, by Catherine Rayner.


 

Common Activities and Games

  • Paper Airplanes

  • Discussing the difference between Wild and Man Made and how we can take care of our wild

  • Mud cakes/Mud Pies

  • Sensory play with mud, pumpkin guts, sand, comparing the feel of nature items: sand, leaves, dirt, tree bark, sticks, rocks, etc

  • Leaf Crowns

  • Playing Super Heroes

  • Playing Firemen

  • Coloring with paper and Crayons

  • Rock climbing

  • Playing Chase/Tag

  • Group Hugs

  • Playing Hide-and-seek, and counting up to 10 in english and spanish

  • Climbing the “Big Dirty Hill” (Neffs Canyon location)

  • Building Squirrel Homes/Delivering Acorns

  • Playing Ninja Training with obstacle courses

  • Discovering new trails and areas to explore

 

Quotes from the Children

  • There was an old dog coming down the trail, and a child said “that dog is so slow, hes just like a tortoise!”

  • Child one said “I’m making the Teacher a smoothie!”, child two responded saying, “I’m making drinks for everyone.” Child one responded back saying “great idea! I’ll do that too!”

  • A child celebrated another child’s creation from the pumpkin guts, exclaiming “they made a gunk ball!! I want to do that, too!”

  • Last month a child coined the phrase “rock-laxin” and it has moved into any place where a child can lean back and relax “tree-laxin”, “log-laxin”, “ground-laxin”, “leaf-laxin”.

A special Moment

Last Thursday, we were visited by a majestic female Red Tailed Hawk who stayed nearby flying from branch to branch. We took a little break from our snack/lunchtime to slowly and quietly follow it a bit through the trees. Each time the Hawk spread its wings and flew, everyone “ooh-ed” and “ahh-ed”. What a wonderful experience that was!!

Overall Development

 

  • Holding and using crayons and pencils to color on paper

  • Sensory play activities learning rough, soft, grainy, sticky, squishy, crunchy, slimy, etc.

  • Understanding that when the mornings feel cold, we can move our bodies to stay warmer, to eat the warm oatmeal, and celebrate the sun when it rises!

  • Student friendships have continued to develop, and the care for each other is seen often. Groups hugs are a common daily activity. All the children invite anyone in who would like a hug. We also continue the awareness that we each own our bodies and each can choose if they want to be hugged or touched, and to respect when another child needs some space. If a child rejects a hug, we suggest maybe the other child ask for a high five or hand hold.

  • Awareness of how to take care of our planet and outdoor learning area. Putting trash in the trash bag, leaving our place better than we found it, and leaving no trace.

  • Unity- our Forest Preschool Team continues to grow stronger in unity. The children are also becoming comfortably more aware of when another child might need to be invited in to a game so as to not leave them out.

  • The children are continuing to feel comfortable with the idea that it’s okay to make mistakes, and there are ways to repair; for each party to feel better. (Saying sorry, inviting a child back to play, expressing how one is feeling to another child, etc)

  • Socializing, conversing, problem solving, cooperating (These skills are almost always on this list!) The children are given more time to problem solve on their own, and adults will step in if we see that they need a bit of support. Grown ups ask questions so everyone feels heard, and then offers suggestions of what might help (in addition to asking “what do you want to happen here?”

  • The children who have been attending Forest Preschool for a while now, either automatically keep their things together, or they do so after one reminder. Children who are younger or new, may need more support, but have easily gotten the hang of this ritual after snack and throughout the day.

  • Hand eye coordination - tossing a ball, stick, or acorn toward a specified object, or kicking a ball to another child.

  • Balance on the rocky and uneven terrain of the Mountains

  • Balancing on logs or rocks

  • Emotional regulation and resilience - children are always supported and validated through their emotions. This validation and support helps them confidently move through the process of feelings, expressing their feeling to a teacher or other child, and to move forward.

  • Physical Resilience - the children each wear their own backpack. Sometimes when a child find themselves off balance and they fall to the ground, they immediately cry out for help to get up. Teachers typically will use their words to help first “I’ll help with my words at first, try rolling onto your tummy and pushing up with your hands and feet”. This almost always works! And the children are encouraged to recognize that they did it, even though it felt hard at first.

  • Checking on each other and helping each other out instead of always going to a teacher

 

Books

For Children

Jump Frog Jump by Robert Kalan

Happy Dreamer by Peter Reynolds

Going Places by Peter and Paul Reynolds

Finding Wild by Megan Wagner Lloyd

Where is My Dragon by Steve Light

One Duck Stuck by Phyllis Root

It’s Not a Stick by Antoinette Portis

The Bear Who Shared by Catherine Rayner

 

 

For Parents:

How to Raise a Wild Child – Scott D. Sampson

No- Drama Discipline – Daniel J. Siegel and Tina Payne Bryson

Simplicity Parenting: Using the Extraordinary Power of Less to Raise Calmer, Happier, and More Secure Kids by Kim John Payne, M.Ed.Lisa M. Ross

 

Family Friendly Hikes:

Cecret Lake, Little Cottonwood Canyon

Donut Falls, Big Cottonwood

Silver Lake, Big Cottonwood Canyon

Lower Bells Reservoir, Little Cottonwood Canyon

The Living Room, Red Butte (Up behind the U)

Ensign Peak, above the Capitol Building (a bit steep, but only .5 miles)

Bonneville Shoreline Trail, above the Avenues

 

Thank you!

 

Children are some of the most magical beings on this earth. The Forest Preschool teachers and I feel honored to spend each day with your children, watching their eyes light up with new discoveries or when they laugh with their friends. Those special moments when they finally accomplish something they’ve been trying over and over, and shouting “I did it!”, then to have their peers acknowledge and celebrate with them. It is amazing to see how quickly they develop connections, care, love, and respect for each other and other living things when these actions are modeled and supported with gentleness.  

 

The teachers and I want to express much gratitude for the involvement you have as parents, and for allowing your child to play and learn in a different and meaningful way at Forest Preschool.

 

By Supporting The Child’s Element, You Are Supporting a Bigger Movement to Change The World, and You Are Appreciated!!

 

Love your Forest Preschool Teachers,

Sara, Cheyanne, Charlotte, and Julie

 

 

 

 

 

 

September 2018 Newsletter​

Forest Families,

What a beautiful start we’ve had this school year!  It’s amazing to see the substantial growth and development in each child within just a few weeks. Every new child that joins us seems to catch up quickly with the other children by watching their classmates and teachers example as they navigate friendships, and tricky forest floor terrain.

Weekly Themes

Each week we have a general theme, encouraging certain skills and characteristics.

Our themes thus far: making friends, kindness to each other, working together, and courage (“I can do it!”).

Each week we have a craft that usually (but not always) supports a visual image of our theme:

Week 1: Hand prints for their first week of Forest Preschool (we can hold hands with friends/Nice to meet you)

Week 2: Making nature bouquets for those we care about (giving kindness to ourselves or others)

Week 3: Nature Loom, every piece we add makes the loom stronger (working together makes us a stronger team)

Week 4: Windcatcher (even when the wind blows against us, we can do hard things!)

 

 

Common Activities and Games

  • Building cairns

  • Collecting acorns and/or building “squirrel homes”

  • Painting on rocks with berries that have fallen

  • Rock climbing

  • Group Hugs

  • “Venturing out” - this entails hiking around to find new discoveries.

  • Building sand castles and “parties”

  • Making Birthday Cakes and singing happy birthday to everyone individually

  • Making dinner (soup, spaghetti, mud pies, lasagna, etc)

  • Making pretend fires. Circle of rocks, sticks in the middle, yellow leaves for flames)

  • Decorating our TeePee’s

  • Hiking the “circle” and locating the “rooster” (a log that looks like a rooster)

  • Playing Hide-and-seek, and counting up to 10 in english and spanish

  • Playing Train or Row boat on a particular log and taking turns choosing our destination

--This log activity comes with a lot of problem solving and teamwork where the boat or train will break down and everyone jumps in to repair it. This happens multiple times throughout the game. The “journey” to their destination is a huge part of their experience!--

 

 

Quotes from the Children

We came across a dead mouse, and a little girl says “I will fix you” and uses her stick as a wand and swirls it around him. After nothing happens, she says “hmm.. He must be really dead.” This allowed for a quick discussion that once something is dead, it will not be able to come back to life.

 

A child found a coffee cup left in our base camp from another hiker, he picked it up and said “Teacher! Look what someone did to our earth! It needs to go in our trash bag!”

 

A child leaned back onto a rock and said “Look! I’m Rock-laxin!”

 

We came across a dying bee, broken wing and legs, a child sweetly said, “Bee, do you need a friend?”

 

One child to another, “You were crying. Are you happy now?”

A Special Moment

 

A handful of the children were playing a toss-the-hat game for quite some time, tossing and catching, giggling and laughing. Working together when the hat got stuck in a tree. Two other children found themselves peacefully playing on their own, one girl gathering and collecting and taking things into a little tree covered den. The other child, sat on a rock pretending to fish with a stick as the rod and a handful of other sticks as the fish.  After sometime, the little girl calls out gently to the toss-the-hat players, and she says “friends! Dinner is ready”

This whole time, she had been preparing dinner for her friends. So heartwarming.

They followed her into the little tree covered den and the boy who had been fishing says “I brought fish!” All the children gathered in a circle and the two cooks passed around rocks and sticks for dinner. Another child jumped up and handed out “tea”. One child then says “the storm is coming! Eat your soup to stay warm and we’ll enjoy this meal together where it is warm”.

For another 10 minutes, the children sat together talking about the storm, conversing about things that happened that day, sang some songs, and discussed some of their favorite things. All these children are 3 and 4 year olds. What a magical scene this was to be a part of.

 

The two children who had been confidently and comfortably playing on their own were not being isolated, instead they were allowed to follow their own lead and share when they felt they wanted to. In this, they  were supported in their own imaginative play by their peers and teachers. If they had been pushed to join the others, this magical little scene would not have happened. Teachers at The Child’s Element Forest Preschool are always assessing each child’s individual needs at any given time whether that means they need support to join a group game or they need to take some time playing quietly on their own. All children are invited to play together, and they are also welcome to play on their own if the mood strikes.

 

Overall Development

 

  • Student friendships have developed quickly. Groups hugs are a common daily activity. All the children invite anyone in who would like a hug.

  • We’ve taught and modeled to ask for a hug before giving one. We teach them that someone might say yes, someone might say no. And that’s okay!

    • If another child says no, a teacher will say “that’s okay that they don’t want a hug, I’m feeling like one, could I have a hug? That way, each child feels validated in their needs.

  • Unity- being a team. Children are not left out of play and all children enjoy playing together.

  • Learning that it’s okay to make mistakes, and there are ways to repair and for each party to feel better. (Saying sorry, inviting a child back to play, expressing how one is feeling to another child, etc)

  • Socializing, conversing, problem solving, cooperating

  • Being responsible for their own items and their whereabouts. Putting things in and out of their backpacks (depending on age, some children receive more teacher support in this)

  • Hand eye coordination

  • Balance on the rocky and uneven terrain of the Mountains

  • Emotional regulation and resilience

  • Checking on each other and helping each other out instead of going to a teacher

 

Books

 

For Children

Happiest Book Ever, by  (a children’s favorite! They ask for it everyday)

Round Like A Ball, by Lisa Campbell Ernst

It's Okay to be Different, by Todd Parr

The Big Book of Bugs, by Yuval Zommer

Staying Healthy

The Feel Good Book by Todd Parr

It's Okay to be Different, by Todd Parr

It’s Okay to Make a Mistake, by Todd Parr

The Earth Book, by Todd Parr

 

For Parents:

Balanced and Barefoot by Angela Hanscom

How to Raise a Wild Child – Scott D. Sampson

No- Drama Discipline – Daniel J. Siegel and Tina Payne Bryson

Simplicity Parenting: Using the Extraordinary Power of Less to Raise Calmer, Happier, and More Secure Kids by Kim John Payne, M.Ed.Lisa M. Ross

 

Thank you!

 

Children are some of the most magical beings on this earth. Their teachers and I feel honored to spend each day with your children, watching their eyes light up with new discoveries or when they laugh with their friends. Those special moments when they finally accomplish something they’ve been trying over and over, and shouting “I did it!”. Then to have their peers acknowledge and celebrate with them. It is amazing to see how quickly they develop connections, care, love, and respect for each other and other living things when these actions are modeled and supported with gentleness.  

The teachers and I want to express much gratitude for the involvement you have as parents, and for allowing your child to play and learn in a different and meaningful way at Forest School.

 

By Supporting The Child’s Element, You Are Supporting a Bigger Movement to Change The World, and You Are Appreciated!!

Summer Term Newsletter

August 19, 2018

Forest Families,

 

As the end of  Summer Term 2018 came to a close, I found myself emotional and very grateful each day during class hours. Each of your children have a special place in my heart. The other teachers and I observed each child grow and develop more independence and confidence, friendships with each other, and an awareness of the earth and how to take care of it. I watched as each child would confidently choose for themselves, lovingly help each other out, check on each other after a fall or "owie," we observed them thinking for themselves, and also saw them expressing their feelings and emotions to their peers and teachers. 

 

As new children were added to the group, the children would quickly welcome them and make them feel a part of the group by showing them their favorite games and activities. Hide and seek was a favorite, and the children took turns counting and hiding. Some of the children learned how to count to 10 or 20 in Spanish and would use this newfound knowledge to incorporate into the game. 

 

In the beginning of the Term, the children asked for A LOT of help getting backpacks on and off, getting their items in and out of their backpack, zipping and clipping, and opening their lunches. I observed during the last week of term the majority of the children not needing any help at all. They confidently got out their own items, and confidently put them away without being asked at the end. Each child also needed minimal reminders to put trash into the trash bag.

 

On our last Monday, I brought in a Praying Mantis that we let go into nature after observing the way it moves and looks around. We read about and talked about how they like to eat alive bugs vs dead bugs. Mosquitoes, moths, and gnats are their favorite foods. They are a friend to gardeners, as they eat the bugs that eat the plants. 

 

Our last day's topic at snack/lunch time was about "Yes, we can!" We read a story book with this title. It goes through a story about 3 animal friends that are different and can do different things. Each of the animals made fun of the others for certain things they COULDN'T do. The book takes a turn for the positive, of course, and they end up celebrating what each animal CAN do. After the story was finished, I asked the kids to show the group something they CAN do. Every child voluntarily jumped up and showed the group something they were proud of. We all cheered and thanked them for sharing their talent. We talked about how we each are different and we each have special things to offer. We also talked about how we can celebrate both our differences and similarities. 

 

The last week of Term we made paint out of Tumeric and berries and the children participated in putting their hand print on a rock or tree to "wave" goodbye to our Forest School area.

 

A list of books that were favorites this Term:

 

Nature Anatomy: The Curious Parts and Pieces of the Natural World, by Julia Rothman

 

Round Like A Ball, by Lisa Campbell Ernst

 

Yes, We Can! by Sam McBratney and Charles Fuge

 

The Otter Who Loved to Hold Hands, by Heidi Howarth and Daniel Daniel

 

We Planted A Tree, by Diane Muldrow

 

It's Okay to be Different, by Todd Parr

 

The True Adventures of Esther the Wonder Pig, by Steve Jenkins and Derek Walter

 

Happy Dreamer, by Peter H. Reynolds

 

What Do You Do With an Idea, by Kobi Yamada and Mae Besom

 

How to Dress a Dragon, by Thelma Lynne Godin and Eric Barclay

 

Green Eggs and Ham, by Dr Suess

 

Living things and Nonliving things, by Kevin Kurtz

 

Miles of Smiles, by Karen Kaufman Orloff

 

Every Breathe We Take, by Maya Ajmera and Dominique Browning

 

Thank You, Earth (A Love Letter to the Earth), by April Pulley Sayre

 

The Big Book of Bugs, by Yuval Zommer

 

 

Many of the animals and insects we talked about this Term:

Hummingbirds

Woodpeckers

Rattlesnakes

King Snakes

Bluebirds

Sparrows

Finches

Box Elder Bugs

Desert Stink Beetle

Spiders - All kinds!

Fire Ants

Black Ants

Any and ALL animal sounds

Bears

Mice

Ligers

Turtles

Potato Bugs

Earth Worms

Turkey Vultures

Golden Eagles/Bald Eagles

Coopers and Red Tailed Hawks

Squirrels
Stink Bugs

Praying Mantis

Cicada

Butterflies

Millipedes and Centipedes

Grasshoppers and Crickets

Bees and Wasps 

 

 

Some of the activities the children participated in:

 

Making weight scales with sticks, a large rock, and small buckets hanging on each end of the stick as it balanced on the rock. 

 

Painting and handprints

 

Making Nature masks

 

Building sand castles and birthday cakes

 

Making squirrel homes 

 

Gathering Acorns and counting them, sharing them, trading them

 

The children developed a "taking-turn system" on their own. Either they went around in a circle, or back and forth in a line. 

 

Hiking our "Circle" (up the creek, and then up an off-shoot trail, back to the main trail, back to base camp)

 

Making small bug or worm homes in our small buckets, talking about what each bug or insect needed to stay alive. (Then letting them go back into their natural habitat)

 

Making wishes as we blew dandelions into the wind

 

Nature Naps where we lay on the ground and we talk about the things we see while looking up, as opposed to down and around (where we most often are)

 

Meditative Moments sitting and listening with our eyes closed, staying as quiet as possible to hear the sounds around us. 

 

 

 

At the beginning of the Term, our hike into Forest School took 45 minutes. By the end of the Term, we had to extend our halfway-water-break from 5 minutes to about 15 minutes to play games and have more activites, because the children had grown stronger and faster and the hike would only take about 20 minutes (that's less than half the time in just 9 weeks!)

 

 

I am incredibly proud of each of the children and their growth and development through these 9 weeks. The teachers and I want to express much gratitude for the involvement you have been as parents, by allowing your child to play and learn in a different and meaningful way at Forest School this summer. 

 

Although, I will miss the children continuing on into Kindergarten, I am elated to know a handful of the children will be continuing on into the school year at Forest Preschool in our new location near Millcreek, UT . There is still space to fill, please share the word to friends and families, if you feel inspired to do so!

 

 

By Supporting The Child’s Element, You Are Supporting a Bigger Movement to Change The World, and You Are Appreciated!!

Warmly and Lovingly,

Sara Lauran, Founder and Director